Category Archives: printrbot

Printing With Steel on the Printrbot Simple

printrbot

One of the most popular pages on this blog is Calibrating the Printrbot Simple. To be honest I haven’t been using my Simple much lately, what with the hullabaloo surrounding my Barbie-Compatible 3D printed armor Kickstarter. Just don’t have the time.

My mental juice can’t be occupied by all Kickstarter, all the time, so I took a few hours to mess around with Mr. Simple, and I decided to try an experiment that’s long been tugging at my frontal lobes. Can I print something recognizable, in metal, using my Printrbot simple and some clever engineering?

There are hobbyist metal printers on the way. I saw Vader Systems’ prototype at Maker Faire NYC, and can’t wait to get one of these bad boys into the basement at Zheng Labs.

But! Enough wishful thinking. Let’s get down to brass tacks.

I’m using baling wire for this project. You can get this stuff at any hardware store. Just make sure it’s not galvanized, because that can give off some nasty zinc fumes when it’s heated up. Also, I highly advise wearing protective gear.

wire

warning Attempt this project at your own risk! There is an excellent chance that you’ll completely junk your Printrbot, or at least melt the plastic collar at the top of the extruder nozzle. Have a fire extinguisher handy, just in case. Goggles, gloves, the whole nine yards. Be smarter than I was: under no circumstances should you down three mimosas before trying this, no matter how much fun you were having at brunch.

As a precaution, you’ll also want to cover the print bed in fire-retardant tape, unless you’re willing to deal with a flaming Printrbot.

I’m planning on doing this repeatedly, so I replaced the Printrbot Simple’s print bed with a piece of asbestos tile instead. Yay for Open Source!

I just redid the kids’ room with asbestos tile and had some left over. It’s cheap and durable and I can’t believe people just throw this stuff away. Watch this space for a blog post about turning old asbestos tile into cutting boards; I’ll be putting them on Etsy once I’ve cut a dozen of them or so.

Temperature is everything here and you’ll have to move quickly once you start, so be sure to have your gCode pre-generated. Don’t waste time slicing the model before you print.

Preheat the extruder as high as you can get it. I managed to get mine up to 275°C by disabling the firmware safeties and working under heat lamps in the basement. (Printrbot firmware hacking is a topic for another day.)

Even 275°C is way too low for melting steel, so you’ve got to help the Simple across the finish line by heating your baling wire up with a propane torch. Depending on the alloy of your wire that means somewhere around 1400°C, which should be within the range of a hardware store torch.

tip

Start the print and gently feed the hot wire into the Simple’s extruder. I epoxied a steel washer onto the collar of the extruder nozzle to protect it from the hot wire. Don’t lick the glowy part!

The print was a miserable failure, just your typical tangle of filament touched by His Noodly Appendage, ramen. This is what happens when you leave steel prints unattended:

print failure

The second time through I stayed with the print, keeping the propane flame focused on the wire as extruder pulled it in.

feed

With just a little filing and polishing the nose ring looks way better than I expected it to. Not bad for a printer kit that retails for $300, even if I did have to babysit the print the entire time.

yurenjiekuaile

Permit me a brief foray into my other hobby, studying Mandarin Chinese. It’s a remarkably concise language, so cramming the entire One Ring poem (to find them, bind them, yadda yadda yadda) onto the side of the ring is easy peasy lemon squeezy.

You can compress the whole poem into five characters, 愚人节快乐. Way fewer than required in the Black Speech of Mordor.

Flagrant stagecraft alert: I printed the ring and nose separately and welded them together afterwards; I haven’t tried printing anything with support yet.

You can download the STL files for the nose ring in the Baubles section of The Forge, or if you’re impatient or don’t have a 3D printer just grab one from Shapeways.

Pro tip: I found that copying my gCode into OpenOffice, coloring it pure red (#FF0000), and then re-pasting it back into Repetier-Host helped me get the extruder nozzle up to 282°C the second time around.

What a difference a year makes.

I’ve been printing with my Replicator1 for just about a year and a half now. Here’s what my Penny Catapult prints looked like when I started out. (This print’s a veteran of many Seej battles.)

And here’s what my prints look like after countless hours of learning and frustration and failure and learning.

That cross-grain seam in the catapult’s side arm is probably caused by two pieces of blue painters’ tape butting up against one another. I do all my PLA printing on painters’ tape whether I’m using my Rep1 or Printrbot Simple.

One major difference between these two prints is that the top is ABS and the bottom is PLA– after a year of working with both I’d have to say I definitely prefer PLA. It smells better and heats up more quickly, which saves precious minutes of printer warming when repeatedly iterating through a design.

You can get a mirror-finish base with ABS, but apart from that I can’t see a reason to bother with it. Most of my stuff doesn’t wind up in high-stress situations so the added strength isn’t much of a draw for me.

Marshmallow Mangonel on the Printrbot Simple


downloadWhen I designed the Penny Catapult to fit on a Replicator1, assuming that printers were only going to get bigger. But the new crop of smaller, inexpensive printers coming down the pike requires a Seej engine that can be printed on a smaller build platform.

Enter the Marshmallow Mangonel. It’ll still throw a penny, but includes a second throwing arm designed for non-coin projectiles; marshmallows, gumballs, magnets, whatever you’ve got lying around that needs to be parabolized. You can find the Mangonel and its bigger brethren in the Seej Engines category in The Forge.

If this is your first exposure to Seej, head over to s33j.net and grab yourself a starter set. Get printing and then get your tabletop wargaming on.

Using Slic3r with the Printrbot Simple and Repetier-Host

Seej Bloxen Flag, Basic

I’ll be using a basic Seej bloxen for my slicing demo. It’s more exciting than a test cube and potentially useful should a vigorous Seej match break out at your makerspace. You can never have enough bloxen sitting around. Grab the model here if you want to follow along.

Open the Object Placement tab and click on Add STL File. Navigate to the bloxen model and Slic3r drops it into your build area. The bloxen should be centered, but if it isn’t, you can fiddle with the translation and rotation values, or just hit Center Object. When you’re done it should look like this:

Added Bloxen

Click the Slicer tab (not the Slice with Slic3r button) and then click the Configure button. We have a few settings to adjust.

This is the point in the tutorial where normally I’d walk you through changing a half dozen parameters. Teach a man to fish, Lao Tzu says, and he’ll eat for a lifetime. Screw Lao Tzu. You want your fish now. You can learn to fish in an hour after your belly’s full.

So I’ve zipped up the settings that have been working for me and put them up for download. You can just swap out whatever default settings showed up with Slic3r with the contents of this archive right here.

On OSX, Slic3r stores its settings in three subdirectories within

~YourUserName/Library/Application Support/Slic3r/

You can copy the archive contents into that directory and you should be good to go.

I have no idea where these settings will be saved in Windows. If you’re on Linux, you’ve already written a shell script to slice models using spare cycles from your video card and can stop reading now.

warningWARNING: The usual warnings about destroying your printer by using the code I’ve provided apply. Use these settings at your own risk. You might think about backing up your old settings in a safe place, just in case.

Once you’ve got the settings installed, click the Slice With Slic3r button. You should have a pile of G-Code in your G-Code panel. I’ve been consistently deleting/commenting out a couple of lines from my code and have gotten good results by really babysitting the first layer of my prints.

Delete this Code

If you comment out the code by putting a semicolon in front of it, the printer won’t use it but it’ll still be there for reference porpoises:

;G28 ; home all axes
;G1 Z5 F5000 ; lift nozzle

This assumes that I’ve manually homed my printer by moving the print bed all the way to the right and the extruder arm as far forward as it will go. The hot end should be over the bottom left of the print bed.

If you’ve manually homed the printer, make sure you hit the Set Home button the the Print panel before you print.

I watch the extrusion carefully on the first layer and adjust the Z-axis manually (physically turning the leadscrew with my fancy new Z-Axis Knob) to make sure I get a good adhesion on the painters’ tape. Once I’m satisfied that the first layer is OK I’ll go wash dishes or something while the printer burbles away.
First Layer

Let’s assume everything turned out more or less OK for you and you’ve got a mostly-perfect bloxen sitting on your print bed. Now would be an appropriate time to learn to fish.

Layers and Perimeters

Layer height: I’ve been getting OK results with .35 mm. This is fairly coarse for a machine that claims .1mm resolution on the spec sheet, but for something as plain-jane as a bloxen it’s probably OK. If you get a .35mm layer bloxen to work, try a higher resolution on a more complicated model. This Magic: The Gathering Beast Token is a great detail test.

Infill

I leave this density at .25 when printing with PLA unless the object’s going to undergo physical stress. If I go much lower I find that the top layer of PLA tends to sag too much for my tastes.

Skirt and Brim

I’ve set my skirt layer height to 0 layers, which effectively turns it off. If you’re not 100% confident in the levelness of your bed, using a skirt can give you a few seconds to nudge your Z-axis before the main body of the print begins. A brim will apparently help your print stick, but I haven’t had to use one yet. Hot PLA and a level platform goes a long way towards sticking to painters’ tape.

Support Material

I try hard to design models that print without support, so I’m not a good source for information on this setting. Keep it off unless you’re printing something that needs it. I keep the raft layers set to 0 as well; no sense in printing more than we have to if things are sticking to the platform anyways.

Filament Settings

Even though your Simple ships with 1.75mm filament, somewhere in a Printrbot setup guide I recall reading that you should set this to 1.70mm. Sure, whatevs.

I’m printing with PLA at 200° for the first layer and 190° for subsequent layers. Go much hotter than 210° and the PLA that printrbot shipped with the Simple starts getting liquid. This seems to work for loading the hot end, but I wouldn’t want to try and print with liquefied PLA.

Printer Settings

I’ve set my Simple to have a 100x100mm build platform, since most of what I’m trying to print is tiny and I usually end up manually homing the printer anyway.

Clearing a Jammed Filament

printrbot calibration fails

In the beginning, One does not know that which One does not know. The Dark Art of 3D printing is shrouded in a miasma of confusion and rage and smug forum posts, and One despairs.

With time, kobolds and goblins and glitches and bugs fall beneath one’s blade as vermin are wont to do, and One’s place at the tavern edges ever closer towards the dim corner where the new Ones timidly approach to receive their quests.

And when One’s troubleshooting reflexes are honed vorpal-sharp, One is a scythe to trouble, or a rapier, or a headsman’s axe, and no issue endures the coming of dusk.


As troubleshooting goes, this is an easy one, but the trick to it is recognizing when it’s happening. This happens on my Replicator, too, it’s just a thing with FDM printing.

The Symptom: The extruder motor pulls the filament in for a few centimeters, and then stops. You can’t feel the motion of the filament between your fingers any more. The extruder motor continues to chug to no effect.

The Problem: A small piece of filament has snapped off inside the extruder, past the drive gear’s ability to move it further. This filament scrap is blocking the new filament from entering the hot end.

The Solution: Remove the hot end from the extruder assembly by backing out the screws that hold it in. Place the hot end on a non-flammable surface and heat it up to 200°C or so. Remove the offending filament with pliers. Let the hot end cool down and then replace it.

Pro tip: an animal-print workspace brings the boys to the yard. Gridded workspaces are sooooooo 2012.

Planting a Flag, Redux

Seej Battle Flag, Basic

About a year ago I designed the Seej Battle Flag, Basic to be printed on my Replicator1. A user on the Printrbot forums was having trouble getting it to print, so I decided to see if I could get it to work myself. Good news! It can be printed on a Simple without any voodoo involved.

It helps if one doesn’t try to print the model all at once, so I’ve broken it into three parts and updated the entries in The Forge and on Thingiverse accordingly.

I find leveling the Simple’s bed along the Y-axis to be a little difficult, especially as the weight of the extruder arm at maximum extension pulls it down in Z. I understand there’s a fix for this, I just haven’t had the chance to apply it yet.

I’ve aligned the parts of the battle flag along the X-axis, which should make them a little bit easier to print individually.

If you’ve never heard of Seej before, check out the rules and give it a go. It’s an Open-Source tabletop wargame based around 3d printing. Have at thee!

Printrbot Z-Axis Knob, Refined

I find myself adjusting the height of the Z-Axis on my Printrbot Simple with every print, sometimes during the print itself. Handling the leadscrew directly can get a little uncomfortable, so having a knob attached to the top of the axis helps a great deal.

Printrbot Z-Axis Knob

downloadThis knob is based off Bill Owens’ Printrbot Simple Z-Axis Knob which is in turn based on jridley’s Parametric hex head screw or nut knob. Circle of LIIIIIIIIFE

This version has some rounded edges for comfort because I’m a delicate desert flower that only blooms once a year and I must preserve my girly hands for stroking my Shih Tzu.

Did you hear about the new zoo that opened in Chicago? It’s only got one animal: a dog. It’s a Shih Tzu.

This knob also has some transitional elements between the two major volumes, and a graceful inverted flare on the shaft. These are completely unnecessary aesthetic changes to the perfectly-usable model made by Bill Owens, but since complexity is free in 3D printing, why not.

Here’s a perfect demonstration of how the Creative Commons license fosters creativity. First, in need of a knob, jridley throws together a parametric design and shares it on Thingiverse. Now anyone can adjust a few numbers and get a printable knob.

Standing on the shoulders of that giant, Owens refined the basic design until he got a knob he could use in his particular situation. He puts it up on Thingiverse where dozens of Printrbot Simple owners download and start using it.

I don’t know much about OpenSCAD, the software jridley used to design the original knob. But I can take the output into software I’m familiar with and edit the geometry to fit my needs.

All legal, all free, no ethical quandaries or patent fights. All we have to do is give each other credit where credit is due.

I found Owens’ knob to be a little loose given the crop of nuts grown in my part of the world, so this model might be a little tighter or looser for you.

You will need a pair of 5/16″ nuts to use this knob properly. Put one nut on your z-axis leadscrew, attach the knob, and then tighten the second nut.

The model is also available in The Forge along with assorted other baubles.

Calibrating the Printrbot Simple

printrbot calibration fails

As a barebones 3D printer the Printrbot Simple needs a little bit of software love before you can reliably print stuff. You’ve gotten your printer together, the X-Y fishing lines are tight, and it’s plugged in. You’re satistifed that despite your hamfisted build process, the bot won’t catch fire, and it’s time to get it calibrated so you can get started on your adventures in 3D printing.

First things first, download and install Repetier-Host. I’m using Version .56 on OSX, but the clicky points should be pretty much the same no matter what OS you’re on. If you’re a TL;DR type, skip to the starting gCode settings at the end of this post and proceed from there.

Repetier-Host desperately needs a name change. In the hierarchy of 3d printing software names, MakerWare is clearly the hep cat, followed by ReplicatorG. Pronterface sounds like a schoolyard insult, and Repetier-Host is the foreign exchange student who eats his own scabs.

Connect to the printer with the button on the top left of the screen. Assuming you get something cryptic in the log at the bottom like:

5:37:47 AM: FIRMWARE_NAME:Marlin V1; Sprinter/grbl mashup for gen6 FIRMWARE_URL:http://www.mendel-parts.com PROTOCOL_VERSION:1.0 MACHINE_TYPE:Mendel EXTRUDER_COUNT:1

You’re connected and ready to go. First, let’s calibrate the X-axis.

The plan here is to find the difference between how we’re telling the bot to move in software and how it’s actually moving in hardware. Variance in motors, line tension, humidity, gear slippage, localized tachyon concentrations, sunspots, Lindsay Lohan, all these things contribute to unpredictability in the Simple’s motion.

Once we find the difference we’ll write a little bit of simple gCode to correct for it.

The first thing you’ll do is set a default value for the X-axis steps per mm. I’ve been using 114.20, but any number in that neighborhood will work for this step. You’ll likely change this value later, so don’t worry too much about it.

Go to the Print panel and enter the following gCode in the G-Code field (inside the Print Panel tab) and then click Send:

M92 X114.20

Not much will appear to happen, but Repetier-Host has silently told your Printrboard to set the steps per mm of the X-axis motor to 114.20. We’re off and running with the calibration process.

Now move the print head all the way to the left. I do this by disconnecting the power supply to disengage the motors and physically sliding the print bed to the right, as if it were an old-style typewriter carriage.

warningWARNING: It looks like physically moving the X-stepper this way generates a current, which you’ll see lights up the status LED on the Printrboard. I’ve done this dozens of times with no apparent damage to the bot, so I’m assuming there’s a diode in there somewhere protecting it. Manhandle your bot at your own risk.

Once you have the X-axis homed, move the Z-axis up just enough that you can slide a ruler under the print head. I’ve covered my print bed in painters’ tape to help prints adhere, which also makes a handy writing surface. Record the start position of the print head with a mark on the tape.

marking the first line

Remove the ruler and click the X +10 button 5 times, for a sofwtare move of 50mm. Record the position of the head again and measure the distance between the two points, in millimeters. Mine was 46mm in this case, but yours may be different. In the unlikely event that your hardware move already matches your software move, congratulations! You’re done with X and can skip on to calibrating your Y-axis.

If your print bed doesn’t move or moves haltingly, there’s a good chance that you don’t have enough tension in the X line. Tighten it up and try again. The first few times I adjusted the line I was being way too gentle and got unpredicatble movement in the print bed, especially before the motor took up the slack on one end. Really pull hard on the line, like you’re trying to land a walleye.

A note to our international readers: a walleye is a type of North American antelope traditionally hunted with tethered harpoons.

We need a little bit of math to figure out our steps per mm. The Magic Formula is:

(old steps value * software move) / hardware move = new steps value

So plugging in our values we get:

(114.20 * 50) / 46 = new steps value

Which evaluates to 124.13 for my bot. Put your value into the gCode field like this:

M92 X124.13

And hit Send again. Test your X calibration by moving the print head back to the left with the X -10 button and recording the position. Repeat as needed until you’re satisfied that the print head is moving precisely enough for your needs. I’m OK with a little slop in my calibration because I’m trying to have fun with this machine and not get obsessive about print quality. It’s not like I’m printing jet engine parts here.

Repeat this process with the Y-axis, except swap the X for a Y in your gCode. I calculated a Y-value of 114.58 this time.

M92 Y114.58

The process is very similar with the Z-axis. Measure the distance from the top of the leadscrew to the extruder head, Z-move the extruder in software, and measure again. I’ve got one end of the ruler resting right on the plywood, sandwiched between the leadscrew and the head of a hex nut.

UPDATE 6/3/13: Read Bill Owens’ comments below on Z-axis calibration.

measuring the leadscrew

Plug your measurements into the Magic Formula and calculate. Calculate like the WIND!

After you’ve got the motion motors moving the way you think they should be, the next thing to do is calibrate the extruder motor. You need to make sure that the motor’s feeding enough filament to the hot end, but not so much that you spaghettify your print bed during a print.

The process is pretty straightforward: wrap a piece of tape around the filament, 10 centimeters up from the extruder.

filament

Set the extruder temperature to 220°. Repetier-Host won’t let you extrude with a cold hot end, so while you’re waiting set the extrude distance to 10mm. It shouldn’t take more than two or three minutes to go from room temperature to 220°.

If your hot end gets up to around 80° and stalls, check to make sure the power supply is plugged in. USB power will get you to 80° without the power supply, which can be deceptive.

After the extrusion is done, measure the distance to the tape again, and use the Magic Formula one more time.

Once you think you’ve all four motors calibrated, it’s time for a test print. You’ll want something simple and small, so that you can iterate quickly through test prints and really home in on the correct settings for your printer.

I’ve been using a 2x2x0.5cm test lozenge, which you can download right here if you’re not into 3d modelling yourself. The lozenge is nothing fancy, no bevels or geegaws. I keep the gCode for it handy so that I can quickly calibrate after a mishap or hardware adjustment. Do not suck the lozenge.

I’ll be exploring Slic3r and test printing in a subsequent post. For now just accept the defaults, hit Slice with Slic3r, and cross your fingers.

Before I print, I put my calibration setting into the Start gCode dropdown. If you’ve never done this before the dropdown can be a little hard to find:

start gCode

Here are the values that have been working well for me lately. They’ll be decent default settings for a Simple, but more than likely you’ll be tweaking them for your own bot. Note that these are a little different from the values I calculated above– there’s been some adjustments done to my bot since I originally started measuring things.

M92 X112.20 ; calibrate X
M92 Y112.58 ; caibrate Y
M92 Z2387.0719 ; calibrate Z
M92 E450 ; calibrate E

Assuming your print bed is mostly level you should have a printed lozenge in short order. Check the dimensions with a pair of calipers and adjust the print settings repeatedly until your OCD is satisfied.

Once you’re reliably printing lozenges, head on over to The Forge and grab a more complicated model to try out.

Also! Pledge fealty to The Horde to receive the latest Zheng3 models along with assorted other useful giblets like this calibration guide.

printrbot calibration fails

Printrbot Simple: First Impressions


Lao Zheng's Printrbot Simple

In mid-May I got all hopped up on endorphins from 6AM yoga and BAM! right there in my Twitter feed was an offer. The first N users who bought a Printrbot Simple would save $50 off the already low, low price of $300. My impulse control weakened by the flush of healthy qi, I had one in my shopping cart within two minutes, or roughly the time it takes me to huff and puff four sun salutations.

Two-fiddy plus shipping isn’t a budget breaker for a 3d printed squirrel magnate, and the gnomes at Interdimensional Bank of Zheng say we haven’t skimmed anything off the upgrades fund in a while, so why not, indeed.

A quick note for anyone thinking they might purchase this printer once it’s out of beta in June and available to folks other than the lucky N.

if (eval(‘yourTime’)>=eval(‘yourMoney’)):
     buyADifferent3DPrinter()
else:
     thisIsThePrinterForYou()


If you’re a high school student with a few hundred bucks and a weekend to burn, grabbing the Printrbot Simple is a no-brainer. If you own a complete set of matching stemware, look elsewhere for your first 3D printer. Especially if your only exposure to 3D printing so far has been the SkyMall catalog.

Make no mistake, even more so than the Replicator1, this is a hacker’s 3D printer. You’re like two steps up from a homebrew RepRap when you get into the Printrbot Simple. If tweaking and calibration and watching prints fail while you dial in gCode ain’t your thing, purchase a different printer.

On the other hand: right after I made my first successful print on the Simple I was mobbed by Brazilian bikini models. Your mileage may vary.

On the gripping hand: as an instructional tool, the impact of the Printrbot Simple can’t be overstated. Anyone who assembles, calibrates, and prints with this bot is going to learn buckets about the ins and outs of 3D printing at a granular level.

Best of all, at $299, it’s relatively inexpensive. I’d be disappointed if hundreds of these bots don’t find their way into high school STEM clubs.

Well-to-do techie parents looking to build a 3D printer with their tweens might be the sweet spot for this bot, but Mom or Dad should be prepared to sneak back to the basement after bedtime to put in an hour or two of extra build time.

The Build

warning The Simple is a beta, so there are guaranteed to be some bumps along the road. It ships as a kit, so you’ve got to put it together yourself. You’re also paying someone else for the privilege of beta testing their hardware, which is a genius business model if ever there was one. Fortunately Printrbot is up front about that fact; “BETA” is laser-etched onto the build platform. You buys your ticket, you takes your chances.

Printrbot describes the build difficulty as “moderate.”

I am reminded of the time I went to the Thai place across town that isn’t my usual Thai place and I ordered the larb with a 7 on the 1 to 10 spicy scale which is where I like it but they use a different hotness scale and hoo doggies that’ll burn tomorrow on the way out but I could still mostly finish it. Ach, mein ass.

So maybe Printrbot’s definition of moderate is different than mine.

I’m not a complete idiot. I can read English and make logical deductions, I’ve got a well-stocked toolbox, I have an amateur’s burgeoning knowledge of electronics, and I’m not afraid to jimmy-jim-jim a part to get it to work. Surprisingly, given my pyrotechnic proclivities as a pup, I still have all ten fingers. I have a SparkFun wish list, for the love of Pete.

Even with my bona fides, I still find Printrbot’s estimate of one to two hours for assembly of the Printrbot Simple wildly optimistic. I’m sure there are wizards from the Printrbot community who can wham-bam-thank-you-ma’am this printer into a finished state in that time, but coming at this build cold I’ve probably got 8 hours put in over the course of three days. Keep build time in mind while you’re salivating over that $300 price tag.

Printrbot’s marketing claims that you can put this together with only a screwdriver. Maybe, if you’re the Last Son of Krypton or you have vise grips for hands. There are a few tools that will make this process much easier:

  • you’ll need super glue.
  • it amazes me that my kit didn’t include an Allen wrench. Maybe Printrbot figures that IKEA has acheived such market penetration that the probability of an Allen wrench being within reach is approaching 1.0 for a given location in the Western hemisphere.
  • a cordless drill with an Allen bit will speed up the assembly considerably.
  • a metric/Imperial ruler so you can tell the different bolts and screws apart
  • scissors or a hobby knife– you’ll be cutting fishing line.
  • an adjustable wrench, and maybe an M3 socket.
  • needlenose pliers
  • zip ties. You’re going to need a lot more zip ties than are included with the beta to manage all those cables.
  • painters’ tape for the print bed. No sense in marring that nice birch any more than you have to.

Most people willing to tackle this process are going to have this stuff in the toolbox anyway, I just include the list because I’m a huge fan of deflating marketing hype by emptoring my caveats.

There’s a point during assembly where one must gently fit two steel rods through laser cut plywood holes; these are the rods that stabilize the extruder arm as it traverses the lead screw. The holes are cut to very fine tolerances, so much so that it can be difficult to push the rods through.

I recommend that you put your steel rods in the freezer maybe an hour before you get started on the build. Thermal contraction will temporarily shrink them just enough to get them through the plywood. Once they warm up again they’ll be nice and snug.


rods in the freezer

Be prepared to slightly modify some of the parts that came with the kit to get them to fit. The laser cut plywood all fit together perfectly, but I had to file down the plastic edges of my hot end so that it fit into the extruder assembly. I accidentally stripped the wood around an M3 nut and had to super glue the nut in.

Not a big deal for your average maker geek, but someone expecting a snap-together 3D printer is going to be sorely disappointed around hour three. You can see where my file chewed up the top of the hot end in the closeup below.


hot end

Suggestions for Printrbot

I’d like Printrbot to etch more directions onto the wooden parts of the printer. Etched labels like “this side faces out” would be very helpful in determining orientation during the build. I got turned around a few times and ended up dismantling and reassembling the previous two steps of my build.

At the end of each step, a photo of the entire printer from multiple angles could help a lot. I kept getting disoriented and had to backtrack or skip ahead to find out what part went where.

Once you get the bot together the first print is very satisfying, but along the way there is likely to be some gnashing of teeth and rending of garments. Here’s a test print of a small cylinder that I did, just to make sure everything was put together properly.


first print

Calibrating the Printrbot Simple so that your prints are the right scale is a whole other can of worms. I’ll get into that in a subsequent post sometime in the next few days. Watch this space.