Seej

A new challenger appears! Hail, and well met!

The Seej Starter Set is available as a pay-what-you-like download at The Bazaar. Stoke the fires of The Forge by supporting Open Source design!


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Seej is a game with four core rules:
1. Topple your opponent’s flags to win.
2. Players must agree on the models used in the battle.
3. Keep it friendly.
4. Show no mercy.

Seej is an Open Source tabletop wargame designed to advance the state of 3D printing through competition and player-directed evolution. Players print their own armaments and fortifications for use in battle. If you can print it, it’s legal to use in the game.

The rules to Seej are open source and infinitely expandable. Seej is distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License.

At a minimum, you’ll need to download and print the Seej 2013 starter set. It contains flags, catapults, and two kinds of bloxen. (You can still download the original starter set for archaeological purposes.)

Print two sets, find an opponent, and have fun storming the castle!

There’s a wide assortment of additional Seej engines, bloxen, and accessories in The Forge.

These models are free to download and print. They are also distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike license, so players are free to modify and remix them for their own games.

Pick-up game:

Players start with three flags, 10 pennies, as many blocks as they like, and at least one siege engine. Try to keep the sides evenly matched. (See Core Rule #3.)

Players agree on a battlefield size. About 1m apart seems to be the right distance for playing with the Zheng3 Penny Catapult. Each player builds a castle and places flags.

Flip a coin to see who goes first.

Players take turns firing projectiles at their opponent’s castle. The first player to topple all three enemy flags wins the game.

Be safe! Although you’re unlikely to injure anyone with the Zheng3 Penny Catapult, the Zheng3 Penny Ballista can do some real damage to soft tissues. Wear eye protection, or better yet, fearlessly face down your enemies with one of these.

This might be a bit much.

Philosophy

Good design, good engineering, and good luck are the three pillars upon which a Seej victory is built. Design your Seej engines well, for your opponents are busy forging superior fortifications in OpenSCAD and SketchUp.

Expanded Rules and Recommendations:

Players may not touch the enemy’s models. Projectiles must be launched from a siege engine: no throwing, dropping, spitting, or otherwise directly involving a human in the siege.

Once a projectile has been fired it’s considered out of play. Keep your unspent ammunition separate from the battlefield to avoid confusion. Play with a backstop to keep projectiles from getting lost.

In the event of a tie, pick up spent projectiles and use them to continue the game. First player to topple an opponent’s flag wins.

No flag may be placed more than 2 block lengths from the leading edge of your castle’s wall. This rule is to prevent smarty-pantses from hiding a flag behind a bookcase.

Strongly suggested: Castle walls should be made of interlocking blocks no larger than 5x3x3 cm. Blocks should fit together loosely enough to give the opponent a sporting chance of destroying a wall with a 10-penny bombardment. (See Core Rule #3.)

Seej engines can be picked up and moved anywhere behind the line created by the leading edge of your structure.

Flags toppled by out-of-game events (seismic activity, strong winds, acts of Dog, etc) may be righted without penalty.

Add or remove as many house rules as you like, as long as all players agree to them before the coin toss. If a rule survives a few games, post it here.


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30 thoughts on “Seej

  1. D0sB0ot

    I remember a game very much like this from the 80’s – Crossbows and Catapults. Looks like no crossbows (ballistas) but I’m sure you could whip one up!

    Reply
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  6. Paul Posner

    I printed a full 2-player set (2 catapults, 6 flags, 16 blocks) for a Chinese Auction giveaway. It received the 2nd highest number of tickets, and I had a few people ask me if I could print them a set…

    Great work!

    Reply
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  13. katie

    Oh, excellent. My sister and I invented a game like this one christmas eve when we couldn’t sleep and had a lot of army men, rubber bands, and pencils. I believe I shall have to play this with my 10yo. (Todays homeschool lesson: you must print yourself an army, or I shall destroy you. MUAHAHAHA….)

    Reply
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