Tag Archives: canon g11

Building Rome in a Day for a Kickstarter video

There’s a Kickstarter statistic that says you’re something like 50% more likely to get funded if you’ve got a movie attached to your project. Currently we’re at about 14% funding for Faire Play 2 in less that a week, which is a nice start.

Here’s our movie, and after you’ve watched it head down below the embed to see a little behind the scenes movie magic.

If you haven’t backed, pop over to Kickstarter and drop a couple bucks on the project. Let’s see if we can’t get to 20% by the end of the day. Share the following link with friends and family on Facebook and Twitter, too! That helps a lot. http://kck.st/1FQ7FZf

Thanks. And now onto the show.

Fun, right? Here’s how Emperor Sparky’s world is done IRL. The title of the post is a little misleading– it takes days— plural– to make a video like this. Weeks, really.

We’re not even talking audio editing, which be a whole ‘nother can o’ worms.

The short answer to “how’d he do that” is Photoshop. Lots and lots of Photoshop. Zheng Labs kicks it old-school with Photoshop CS2, the last version of Photoshop that runs on our 32-bit Mac Pro tower. (hence the Kickstarter– more operating capital==better equipment and software to crank out fun projects like this more quickly.) I’m shooting almost everything with a battered old Canon G11, except for a few quickies I take with an iPhone here and there.

And cardboard. Lots of cardboard and a matte knife. No laser cutting here, not yet anyway.

The first step is to make and paint the most important part of the set, Sparky’s balcony. I’d been saving paper towel tubes for use as columns for months.

This piece of the set is mostly made from spray paint, old Amazon Prime boxes, masking tape, and crayons. One can accomplish a lot with these simple tools if one drinks a lot of cheap coffee and mainlines Science Friday podcasts in the basement at 4:30 AM on Saturday before anybody else in the house is awake to bother you.

001

It’s all set up on my workbench down in the basement. Sparky’s stuck into the scene for reference purposes only– he doesn’t show up in the final shot.

Next, I start duplicating pieces of the background arches to hide the basement in the background. Sparky disappears behind a piece of background created straight-on in another shot and deformed to match the perspective of the arch behind him. Apparently I wasn’t happy with that blue pennon on the right sticking out, because I replaced it with a duplicate of the pennon on the left.

003

Continue to fill in background pieces here and there, making sure there aren’t any gaps and the perspective and lighting more or less match.

004

My basement is slowly disappearing as I copy and paste pieces of virtual cardboard into the background. All throughout this process I’m making little tweaks with Photoshop’s cloning and healing brushes too. Also dodging and burning as appropriate and redrawing crayon lines where needed in an attempt to keep the artwork as organic as I can.

Faking shadows is really important, too. Lots of fake shadows with a bit of Gaussian blur on them help pieces of the set pop visually.

005

Here we’re finished adding background and a blue sky, which definitely doesn’t exist in my basement. Adjust the final lighting and paste in the LEGO gladiator. He’s a foreground element so he’s shot in a lightbox, isolated with Photoshop’s extraction tools, and then pasted in.

006

Aesthetics are far more important than reality in a venture like this, so darkening the archways was an important step towards achieving a pleasing image. As a final flourish, hand-draw the laurels on the red pennon with one of Photoshop’s custom brushes to simulate crayon.

So that’s basically how the inside of the cardboard Colosseum was made; repeat that basic process for about 47 more shots and you’ve got yourself a video, buster.

The establishing wide shot of the Colosseum is another matter entirely. It’s not so much Photoshop as Autodesk Maya. First, a background plate so I can get the perspective close enough.

standin

I’m using the Lincoln Logs can as a stand-in for the final Colosseum.

Photoshop’s warping and lighting tools leave something to be desired, so for this shot I created a rough 3D model in Maya and then mapped the cardboard textures onto it.

wireframe

The 3D model is just a little too perfect (and stable-looking) when it’s rendered out, so the Maya image gets pulled into Photoshop again for tweaking, slicing, and dicing. I blow out the saturation and move some background and foreground elements around, too. Note the addition of a d20 in the foreground. I loves me some gratuitous icosohedrons.

That electrical outlet isn’t there in real life, either; I added it to improve the final composition and set the scale of the scene in the viewer’s mind.

opening

Thanks for reading this far! If you haven’t already done so, please back the Faire Play 2 Kickstarter. With your help, I’ll be able to take the budget for the next Kickstarter video well into double digits.

D’Oh! Almost forgot to mention! Those capitals and plinths on the paper towel tubes that turn them into Ionic columns? They’re available for free download right here. They’re printed in Filabot’s Carbon Fiber ABS, which makes them nigh indestructible and probably overkill for an application like this, but then again I’m a belt-and-suspenders sort of hominid.

Also, Coco says hi.

column

Meow!