Tag Archives: gaming

Saving the Beast for Last

Here’s the last in a series of posts describing my process for creating a 3D-printed Magic: The Gathering Beast token.

beast_token

After many iterations and test prints, I settled on this pose for the Beast token. The neck and limbs are angled with minimal overhangs so that the printer can build the model all in one go.

And here’s the final model, preening in front of a pile of test prints.

beast_token

download

This model is free to download and distributed under the Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 US license. Please remix and enjoy.

I have another MTG token in the pipeline, so stay tuned: follow this blog or find me on Twitter for updates from the Forge.

MTG Beast Token, Test Print

This token and an ever-expanding list of others like it is available for free in The Forge.

I like to run a test print before I start posing a model, just to see where the problem spots are going to be. Consumer-level printers like the Replicator are hindered by gravity and overhangs; one can’t print too far out into empty space without the melted plastic drooping and bunching up.

beast_token

The base pose for the Beast isn’t too bad, but I can see that I’m going to need to angle the head and chest up so that the printer creates its own support as it prints.

The long filament coming off the back of the base is leftover from the printer clearing its nozzle at the start of a print.

You can download the completed model here, completely free.

No printer? I’ll print you as many as you need at my Etsy Store. A half-dozen should do it for most games.

This model is distributed under the Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 US license. Please remix and enjoy.

MTG Beast Token, Day 7

I’m preparing the model for posing now. No more geometry edits.

The idea is that each bone in the character’s skeleton affects the vertices around it. Rotate, translate, or scale a bone and the vertices go along for the ride. This is Character Rigging 101, no fancy dynamics or muscle deformers or puppeteering controls.

Maya does a pretty good job of deciding which vertices are affected by which joint, but sometimes it needs a little assistance. I help it along by painting weights on a per-joint basis. Black vertices are not affected by a given bone, white vertices are totally affected. Gray vertices have a percentage assignment, which helps smooth out transitions between two joints.

Read my original post showing the completed model, or you can download it model here, completely free.

No printer? I’ll print you as many as you need at my Etsy Store. A half-dozen should do it for most games.

This model is distributed under the Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 US license. Please remix and enjoy.

MTG Beast Token, Day 5 and 6

beast_token

Here’s the Beast Token on Day 5. I’ve added some rhino armor and replaced the tail and horns. I have maybe one more day of details and then it’s on to the posing process.

I’m going to pay for adding the armor when it comes time to weight the vertices to the skeleton, but Rule of Cool trumps all.

And here he is on day 6:

beast_token

I added some final details in the shoulder and eye socket, and scaled everything down to fit the standard base I’ve been using.

There might be some minor edits after this, but for all intensive porpoises the modelling is finished.

The next step is to rig the model with a test skeleton to make sure all the joints deform properly without too much distortion. In theory, I’ll be able to pose this model any way I like.

You can download the completed model here, completely free.

No printer? I’ll print you as many as you need at my Etsy Store. A half-dozen should do it for most games.

This model is distributed under the Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 US license. Please remix and enjoy.

MTG Beast Token, Day 4

beast_token

This is day 4 of my ongoing Beast blogging. If you’re new to the series, you might want to skip to the end and see what the finished 3d print looks like.

I realized the fancy headgear wasn’t going to print, so the horns had to get a lot simpler. The back spikes and teeth are joined to the main body, and much of the facial detail is filled out. I scaled down his eye to keep him from looking being too cute. I decided on hooves because the claw details probably wouldn’t have printed well. The tail’s a placeholder for now.

You can download the completed model here, completely free.

This model is distributed under the Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 US license. Please remix and enjoy.

MTG Beast Token, Day 3

beast_token

MTG Beast Token, Day 3: The head’s been joined to the body and I’ve put in some facial details, including a creepy double-pupil goat eye.

I haven’t joined the horns or tusks to the main mesh yet. Now’s the time to take a step back and consider the shape of the remaining large-scale forms: mane, tail, and the as-yet undecided hooves or claws.

90 more minutes. Why 90 minutes at a time? I usually get up at 5am. By the time I get caffeinated and moving, it’s 5:30, and then I can put in an hour and a half (more or less) before it’s time to get younger Zhengspawn up for school.

If you don’t want to wait a few days to see how the Beast turned out, here’s the blog post describing the final model.

MTG Beast Token, Day 2

beast_token

90 more minutes in. I’ve built out the foreleg and roughed out the head, but haven’t joined anything yet.

He’s fast becoming a boar-lion hybrid, in keeping with the “badass herbivore” theme. I’ll put in tusks, horns, and a tail once I’m happy with the rough form.

The mouth is open for now so that I’ll have an easier time setting up the model for posing later.

SPOILERS: The final model is a free download.