Tag Archives: ReplicatorG

MakerWare 2.0 Beta: First Look

TL;DR summary: I was all excited to check out the performance of this new software, but couldn’t connect to my Replicator Dual even after extensive troubleshooting. I’m sticking with ReplicatorG for now.

This is MakerWare 2.0.1.211 running on OSX 10.6.8.

The download: the DMG for this called the MakerWare Bundle of Awesome; MBI remains lighthearted even in its mundane business details. I’m downloaded and installed in less than a minute. So far, so good.

The first thing I notice when I launch the application, even before the “What’s New” dialog, is that they’ve replaced the old gradient background with a subtle cityscape.

welcome

The software asks which MakerBot I’ll be using today. I’ll just select my Replicator Dual, now second from the bottom in the drop-down menu, and continuing its descent into obsolescence as progress trudges on.

The first thing I want to do is turn off the cityscape. I’m used to design applications that get out of the artist’s way– Photoshop, Maya, Illustrator, all these give me the option to eliminate geegaws and focus on the work at hand. I’d like an RGB 161,161,161 background, please.

I click the settings button in the upper right. No luck there, but it’s nice to be able to change my object display colors. So I go to MakerWare->Preferences, hoping maybe there’s some advanced settings there. Nope, it opens the same dialog.

I can’t find a place to turn the background off, so it looks the the cityscape is here to stay. Moving on.

Before I can print anything, I’ll have to connect to my Replicator. The broken USB cable button in the lower right looks helpful, so I click it. I get a notice that my Replicator Dual isn’t connected, and an option to “Export to File,” which I assume lets me save my bot settings.

not connected

I poke through the menus, looking for something that’s obviously “Connect to Machine.” Can’t find it. Must be an autodetect? I’ll quit and restart.

MakerWare starts up and some status boxes appear and disappear telling me that the Replicator is connected *and* disconnected. Don’t blink, you might miss it. The bot still doesn’t appear to be connected, since that USB cable icon is broken.

UI Design tip: the “sheared cable” icon might imply that the cable’s just really, really long; a less ambiguous visual cue would be a big red X over the icon.

Twenty years of talking relatives through hardware problems over the phone tells me the next logical thing to do is power cycle the bot.

The bot chirps its happy startup song and I see the same connected/disconnected status boxes fade in and out. As far as I can tell, I’m still not connected to the bot.

Sometimes the USB ports on my laptop get a little fussy, so I’ll try moving the cable around. Same results: still a disconnected Replicator.

So I click the Help button. It’s all UI help. Useful, no doubt, but not in my present circumstance.

help screen

I had some trouble with MakerWare 1.0 and the conveyor background services, so I’ll try turning those off and on again. No good.

Now I reach way way down into my troubleshooting bag of tricks, into the late 80’s. Turn everything off and on again, and restart from scratch.

Still no connection between the software and the hardware. MakerBot’s support page tells me to go to Services->Restart background service. I’ve done that already, but OK, let’s give it another go.

Still no connection. Just to make sure I’m not a complete idiot, I quit MakerWare and hop over to ReplicatorG to see if I can connect there. ReplicatorG connects instantly, so this is definitely a MakerWare problem.

Ok, big guns. Go to Terminal and ps -ef | grep conveyor. Find the conveyor process and kill -9 it, so I can restart it from MakerWare. This is the Unix equivalent of taking off and nuking the site from orbit.

Go back to MakerWare and restart the service. MakerWare crashes after a few seconds of spinning beachball. Maybe kill -9 was a bit much.

Restarting shows me a services error.

services error

ReplicatorG still works.

I try an uninstall/reinstall, using the uninstaller provided in the disk image. I’m back to the broken USB icon again.

Meh. I’ll try a workaround tomorrow, printing from the SD card so I can evaluate the UI and printing experience. In the meantime I’ll get in touch with MakerBot Support and see if we can’t figure out what’s up.

What should my first layer look like?

Your 3D printer just arrived. The nearest hackerspace is 100 miles away. You’re all ready to start printing, but all you really know about the technology is what you’ve seen on YouTube videos and breathless reports on Wired, or the Colbert Report.

They never show you the bottom of the print in any of those venues. It’s always Stanford bunny this or Colbert head that, and that’s all well and good but there’s no one around to tell you you’re doing it wrong.

first layer

I was happily printing failbottom models for months before I went to Maker Faire in Detroit and saw a proper print done by some experts.

The stringy bottom on the first two prints is mostly caused by having an off-kilter heated build platform. Make sure your heated build platform is as level as possible before you start printing.

MakerBot Replicator 1
ABS, 240° C
HBP 110° C, with painters’ tape

(These are prints of my Magic: The Gathering Fungus Tokens, available for free download in The Forge.)

MakerBot’s leveling script never seems to work perfectly for me, but since I’m printing small objects anyway I just make sure the HBP is locally level in my printing footprint. There’s no need for the corners of the platform to be 100% level if the center’s good enough.

I often start a print and let it run for a single layer to let the print heads get to their destination. Then I abort the print, remove any plastic from the HBP, and use ReplicatorG’s homing function to home the Z-axis to minimum.

(In ReplicatorG, go to Machine->Control Panel and select the Homing menu to do this.)

Then it’s a matter of twiddling the thumbscrews on the HBP until the nozzle passes MakerBot’s business card test. When you slide a business card between the nozzle and the HBP and the surface of the card just catches on the nozzle, you’ve got it.

It takes some time to get a knack for it, so don’t despair. I find it works best when the nozzle makes an indented scratch along the card’s face.

The first company to ship an auto-leveling build platform gets a fistful of cash from me.

It’s possible to get a mirror-smooth base when printing on kapton, but I’m mostly printing with ABS on painters’ tape right now. More on that in a subsequent post.