Tag Archives: stranger things

Internet of Stranger Things

TLDR; I made a Stranger Things Christmas Lights wall that you can control by adding #InternetOfStrangerThings to a tweet. It’s outside my house right now, blinking. Go ahead, tweet to it.

justice

Halloween! That time of year when Makers, who, if we’re being honest, are a little odd to begin with, let their freak flags fly with electronic projects of every kind. If you’ve been keeping up with the Zhengs you’ll already know about Plutarch the pirate parrot and the Lovely and Talented Mrs. Zheng3’s Arduino-enabled Pirate Pendant, but we’ve got one more project in the hopper this season: a Christmas light wall inspired by runaway Netflix hit Stranger Things. Plus, you– yes, YOU can tweet to this wall and your tweet will appear as a eerie sequence of glowing Christmas lights outside my house.

Try it yourself! Be nice, you bastids.

Let There Be Lights

Head out into the wilds of Amazon Prime and you’ll find plenty of LED Christmas lights that might– and we must stress might— fit the requirements of this project. Point against: our crack research team was dismayed to find that most modern Christmas lights seem to be spaced between 4″ and 6″ apart, which simply will not do for an application where the letters are more widely distributed.

Also, it’s highly unlikely that your garden variety Sunday church picnic Christmas lights are individually addressable. So in theeeeeeory we could buy a roll of Christmas lights, hack them apart with a Dremel and wire cutters and hope they’re what we need, or we could just make our own. DIY is ultimately more satisfying, so to the 3D printer it is!

Filabot was kind enough to send me a free roll of PETG+ for review. This filament prints somewhere between clear and frosty white, depending on the thickness of the model’s outer walls. It’s easy enough to whip up a few dozen hollow Christmas lights bulbs in Maya. (Got access to a 3D printer? You can download these models fo’ free at the The Forge.)

bulb

We don’t need the durability or transparency of PETG for the Christmas light bases, so they’re printed in MeltInk PLA/PHA and spray-painted black. These bases screw into the bulbs and have enough empty space in the bottom to accommodate a cut-down female header for plugging and unplugging.

Organization is key to completing a project with so many little parts! There’s not a lot of space on them for labeling with proper digits, so I hashmarked each base with silver Sharpie. This will help keep the colors in the proper sequence when I string up the lights.

sockets

Recovering from Failure

Strap in, muggles. It’s going to get technical for about a few paragraphs here.

Around Christmastime last year I was working on a project where I was trying to read data from 60-odd sensors. This project ultimately cratered, and we shall refer to it in hushed tones as the Multiplexer Incident of Winter 2015. It’s mostly behind us now. Mostly.

On the plus side, I learned an awful lot about multiplexers and cabling and bought a slew of electronics and more hookup wire than I’ll ever use. We can apply those newly-gotten smarts and parts to the Stranger Things wall.

First off, for those uninitiated– WTF is a multiplexer? In this context, a multiplexer (or mux, if ye be in the know) is a doodad that reads many signals into a single channel, or distributes one signal to many destinations. This wonderfully-written post at bildr will tell you how to read from this Sparkfun mux breakout, and writing to the mux requires only a couple of small modifications to the code. We’ll be writing to this mux to light up LED’s in a specific sequence.

Of course you need a bunch of colored LED’s, also.

You don’t want to run an LED without a current limiting resistor– down that path lies a wastebasket of fried electronics. Each mux can handle up to 9 volts, but that’ll cook the LED’s right quick. Happily these colored LEDs can be handily divided up into two groups; those with an operating range of 2.0-2.2V, and those that run at 3.2-3.4V. I put one 186-ohm on the SIG pin feeding the 2.2V LED’s and a 119-ohm on the other mux running the 3.2’s.

I told you it was going to get technical for a few paragraphs.

We want these LED’s to be in a predictable Christmas-light-like order: red, green, blue, orange, pink, purple, yellow, repeat, so there’s some software mapping of mux-pin-to-LED happening in the Arduino code. Higher voltage LEDs are on the mux labelled B.

light map

Building A Wall, Except Mexico Didn’t Pay for It, I Did

The budget for this project works out to less than $100, including plywood but assuming you’ve already got a 3D printer in the basement and your time has no value.

Programming microcontrollers, navigating the Twitter API, and tying it all together with heat shrink and hope is easy. Building stable outdoor displays out of 2×4’s and plywood? That’s hard, man. Definitely out of my element here, especially since I don’t have an easy way to make miter cuts in 2×4’s.

Confession: during construction, a piece of plywood fell down and hit me in the neck.

With enough screws and construction adhesive the whole thing should hold together for a couple of weeks and hopefully not fall over onto any pint-sized stormtroopers. Here’s the finished product– hat tip to our local Sherwin Williams for the Coriander Powder color match of a laser-printed Stranger Things screenshot.

daylight

Plywood ships in a 2:1 aspect ratio, but somebody really should manufacture 16:9 sheets for those of us who occasionally cross discliplines.

The “wires” strung between the Christmas lights are black nylon rope; the actual wiring is done with hookup wire stapled to the back of the wall. I also added “@” and “#” and @Zheng3_jim to the original A-Z. (You should probably follow me on Twitter if you’re not doing so already, cause I tweet about cool Maker shizz ALL THE TIME.)

This dog’s breakfast of electronics parts are jammed into a (hopefully) waterproof Ziploc storage container attached to the back of the wall. It’s a mess back there with the breadboards and jumper wires, but should be good enough for a temporary installation. Note warning label on it to discourage tampering and/or theft.

picovolts

Sun Tzu says: appear weak when you are strong, and strong when you are weak.

Reading From Twitter

Oy. A detailed description of how to do this is beyond the scope of this post. Suffice it to say that I’m using Tweepy, OAuth, and a poorly-written Python script that you can download here. Be sure to swap out my placeholder authorization tokens with your own.

In pseudocode, here’s how this whole thing works:

loop:

read the latest 100 #InternetOfStrangerThings tweets from Twitter
pick a random tweet from the list
filter the results for harsh language
if no appropriate tweet is found, use something benign (HAPPY HALLOWEEN, JUSTICEFORBARB, etc.)
smoosh the tweet into ASCII code

loop:

send the ASCII over serial to the Arduino as bytes
map the incoming byte to a mux pin
light the appropriate LED
wait a little bit between letters

wait a little while between tweets

Presumably one of the chans or reddit will eventually catch wind of this project, so before we send any text to the Arduino it gets filtered against a text file of slurs and epithets I keep around for precisely this purpose. There are kids around, for fuck’s sake.

An old laptop sits inside, shoving sanitized data into the Arduino through a 30-foot USB cable. That’s right, the tweets are coming from INSIDE THE HOUSE.

Download the microcontroller code here for a sterling example of how not to program an Arduino.

Tweet anything you like with the hashtag #InternetOfStrangerThings and it’ll wind up on the wall if your text gets past the filters. I’ll be tweaking the code between now and Halloween to make it more responsive to input from Twitter, and if I can figure out an easy way to set up realtime video stream I’ll do that too.

Happy Halloween if I don’t talk to you sooner. Lao Zheng out.